Our Full Day-by-Day Schedule of Summer Workshops and Events

 

We host workshops for children and adults, many of them on our Drawing Room deck in Seal Harbor.

We host workshops for children and adults, many of them on our Drawing Room deck in Seal Harbor.

On top of all the learning, interacting and shopping that the two Naturalist’s Notebook locations offer seven days a week, we’re putting on some great summer events:

• Children’s art/nature workshops five days a week, most in Seal Harbor, some in Northeast Harbor. Parents are welcome too. In fact, we suggest that children under 7 be accompanied by a parent or other adult.

• Adult and teen art workshops in in drawing, color and encaustic painting, in Seal Harbor in August, led by Dina Helal (below) of the Whitney Museum and Margaret Krug (also below) of Parsons The New School and the author of An Artist’s Handbook. DATES TO BE ANNOUNCED SOON!

One of the encaustic workshops taught last summer by Dina (second from left).

One of the encaustic workshops taught last summer by Dina (second from left), who is a great artist and educator and is beloved by everyone who has taken a Notebook class from her.

Here's Margaret leading one of her past workshops at the Notebook in Seal Harbor. She is not only a teacher but also a superb artist, art historian and writer (in books and for American Artist magazine).

Here’s Margaret leading one of her amazing past workshops at the Notebook in Seal Harbor. She is not only a teacher but also a superb artist, art historian and writer (in books and for American Artist magazine).

• July 23 Q-and-A in Seal Harbor with Katie Stack Morgan (below) of the Mars Rover project

Katie gave Pamelia and me a tour of the Jet Propulsion Lab in March. That's where the Mars Rover project is based.

Katie just completed her Ph.D. at Caltech and works at the Jet Propulsion Lab (JPL) in Pasadena, Calif., where the Mars Rover project is based. She gave Pamelia and me a tour of the JPL in March.

• Aug. 12 talk by one of the world’s foremost astronomers, Alex Filippenko (below) of the University of California at Berkeley (offsite at a larger venue, the Schoodic Institute, the talk’s co-sponsor)

Pamelia with Alex in our Big Bang Room when he visited last September for his keynote speech at the Acadia Night Sky Festival.

Pamelia with Alex in our Big Bang Room in Seal Harbor when he visited Mount Desert Island last September for his keynote speech at the Acadia Night Sky Festival. Read more about his talk under AUGUST 12 farther down in this blog post.

• Aug. 13 talk by one of the world’s greatest naturalists and most popular nature/science writers, Bernd Heinrich (offsite at a larger venue, the Schoodic Institute, the talk’s co-sponsor)

Pamelia and I with Bernd at his cabin in western Maine last year.

Pamelia and I with Bernd at his cabin in western Maine last year. Read more about his talk under AUGUST 13 farther down in this blog post.

• Aug. 15 reading and signing in Seal Harbor by Bernd Heinrich

At his Notebook talk and signing last summer, Bernd gave us a peek at the cover of his latest book, which didn't come out until April 2014.  You never know what scoops you'll get if you come to the Notebook!

At his Notebook talk and signing last summer, Bernd gave us a peek at the cover of his latest book, which didn’t come out until April 2014. You never know what scoops you’ll get if you come to the Notebook!

• Aug. 22 reading and signing in Seal Harbor by Eileen Rockefeller

Eileen, a Seal Harborite, will read from her new book.

Eileen, a Seal Harborite, will read from her insightful new book.

• Our annual Sweet 16 Honey-Tasting Tournament (below) every day in Seal Harbor starting in late July

Taste two honeys per day and vote for your favorite—the winner moves on to the next round of the tournament! Can Maine Wild Raspberry defend its 2013 title?

Taste two honeys per day and vote for your favorite—the winner moves on to the next round of the tournament! Can Maine Wild Raspberry defend its 2013 title?

And much more. Below is the current day-by-day schedule, which we will update as changes occur. Remember to like and follow the Facebook page for The Naturalist’s Notebook for daily reports!

DAY-BY-DAY GUIDE

MONDAY, JULY 21

Seal Harbor Naturalist’s Notebook, 10-11:30 a.m.

Children’s art workshop: “Exploring Maine Forests and Tides”

With Jordan Chalfant (below)

$15 per child ($25 for two)

Jordan is both a gifted artist and a serious naturalist and biologist.

Jordan is both a gifted artist and a serious naturalist and biologist.

TUESDAY, JULY 22

Seal Harbor Naturalist’s Notebook, 10-11:30 a.m.

Children’s art workshop: “Underground Art: Vegetables, Roots, Caves and Dirt”

With Shannara Gillman (below)

$15 per child ($25 for two)

Shannara (right, with fellow Notebooke Gem Lawrence) ran our color-themed 13.8-billion-year art workshops at the Northeast Harbor Notebook Annex last summer.

Shannara (right, with fellow Notebooker Gem Lawrence) ran our color-themed 13.8-billion-year art workshops at the Northeast Harbor Notebook Annex last summer.

WEDNESDAY, JULY 23

Seal Harbor Naturalist’s Notebook, 10-11:30 a.m.

Children’s art workshop: “Wildflowers and Botany”

With Amy Gagnon (below)

$15 per child ($25 for two)

Amy, an artist and horticulturalist, has been painting an Acadia National Park carriage road scene in the Notebook in Seal Harbor.

Amy, an artist and horticulturalist, has been painting an Acadia National Park carriage road scene in the Notebook in Seal Harbor.

 

Pamelia and I and animation genius Dan McCoy of Pixar took part in one of Amy's botanical drawing workshops last summer. Her class is for all ages!

Pamelia and I and animation genius Dan McCoy (far left) of Pixar took part in one of Amy’s botanical drawing workshops last summer. Her class is for all ages!

ALSO ON WEDNESDAY, JULY 23, A SPECIAL APPEARANCE

Seal Harbor Naturalist’s Notebook, 3:30-5 p.m.

Q-and-A about Mars and the Mars Rover with Katie Stack Morgan (below), a scientist from Caltech and the Jet Propulsion Lab in Pasadena, Calif., who works on the Mars Rover project. Katie is young, dynamic, incredibly nice and a great role model for girls in particular. Come meet her! She is going to curate a Mars Room at The Naturalist’s Notebook over the next two years. She’ll be around until 5 p.m. to talk and answer questions.

 

Katie with me in March at the JPL's Mars Yard, which is used to test Mars Rovers.

Katie with me in March at the JPL’s Mars Yard, which is used to test Mars Rovers.

THURSDAY, JULY 24

Northeast Harbor Naturalist’s Notebook Annex, 11 a.m.-noon

Children’s art workshop: “Making a Specimen Collection”

With Jordan Chalfant (below)

Free

 Jordan has been painting the walls and ceiling of our Forest and Tidal Room in Seal Harbor with a scene that extends from Mount Katahdin to the rocky coast.

Jordan has been painting the walls and ceiling of our Forest and Tidal Room in Seal Harbor with a scene that extends from Mount Katahdin to the rocky coast.

ALSO ON THURSDAY, JULY 24

Seal Harbor Naturalist’s Notebook, 2-3:30 p.m.

Children’s art workshop: “Exploring the Ocean”

With Robin Owings (below)

$15 per child ($25 for two)

Robin has been curating our Ocean Room in Seal Harbor. She has been painting the floor and walls and building ocean-themed installations.

Robin has been curating our Ocean Room in Seal Harbor. She has been painting the floor and walls and building ocean-themed installations.

Robin led needle-felting workshops last summer at which children created ocean animals to help us build a healthy coral reef. She'll do that again as part of her workshop series.

Robin led needle-felting workshops last summer at which children created ocean animals to help us build a healthy coral reef. She’ll do that again as part of her workshop series.

FRIDAY, JULY 25

Northeast Harbor Naturalist’s Notebook Annex, 11 a.m.-noon

Children’s art workshop: “Northeast Harbor Birds”

With Eliza Rockefeller

Free

Eliza, who helped us create a downtown Northeast Harbor birding walk last summer, also helped out at a marbleizing workshop in Seal Harbor. Stay tuned—we may be holding another of those with teacher Shira Singer.

Eliza, who helped us create a downtown Northeast Harbor birding walk last summer, also helped out at a marbleizing workshop in Seal Harbor. Stay tuned—we may be holding another of those with teacher Shira Singer.

In fact, here's Shira Singer leading a marbleizing workshop last summer. We created planets!

In fact, here’s Shira Singer leading a marbleizing workshop last summer. We created planets!

 MONDAY, JULY 28

Seal Harbor Naturalist’s Notebook, 10-11:30 a.m.

Children’s art workshop: “Exploring Maine Forests and Tides”

With Jordan Chalfant

$15 per child ($25 for two)

Jordan is a natural explorer herself. Here's a shot of her from a few years ago doing a gull count on Egg Rock.

Jordan is a natural explorer herself. Here’s a shot of her from a few years ago doing a gull count on Egg Rock.

TUESDAY, JULY 29

Seal Harbor Naturalist’s Notebook, 10-11:30 a.m.

Children’s art workshop: “Underground Art: Vegetables, Roots, Caves and Dirt”

With Shannara Gillman

$15 per child ($25 for two)

WEDNESDAY, JULY 30

Seal Harbor Naturalist’s Notebook, 10-11:30 a.m.

Children’s art workshop: “Wildflowers and Botany”

With Amy Gagnon

$15 per child ($25 for two)

THURSDAY, JULY 31

Northeast Harbor Naturalist’s Notebook Annex, 11 a.m.-noon

Children’s art workshop: “Making a Specimen Collection”

With Jordan Chalfant

Free

ALSO ON THURSDAY, JULY 31

Seal Harbor Naturalist’s Notebook, 2-3:30 p.m.

Children’s art workshop: “Exploring the Ocean”

With Robin Owings

$15 per child ($25 for two)

FRIDAY, AUG. 1

Northeast Harbor Naturalist’s Notebook Annex, 11 a.m.-noon

Children’s art workshop: “Northeast Harbor Birds”

With Eliza Rockefeller

Free

MONDAY, AUG. 4

Seal Harbor Naturalist’s Notebook, 10-11:30 a.m.

Children’s art workshop: “Exploring Maine Forests and Tides”

With Jordan Chalfant

$15 per child ($25 for two)

TUESDAY, AUG. 5

Seal Harbor Naturalist’s Notebook, 10-11:30 a.m.

Children’s art workshop: “Underground Art: Vegetables, Roots, Caves and Dirt”

With Shannara Gillman

$15 per child ($25 for two)

WEDNESDAY, AUG. 6

Seal Harbor Naturalist’s Notebook, 10-11:30 a.m.

Children’s art workshop: “Wildflowers and Botany”

With Amy Gagnon

$15 per child ($25 for two)

THURSDAY, AUG. 7

Northeast Harbor Naturalist’s Notebook Annex, 11 a.m.-noon

Children’s art workshop: “Making a Specimen Collection”

With Jordan Chalfant

Free

ALSO ON THURSDAY, AUG. 7 

Seal Harbor Naturalist’s Notebook, 2-3:30 p.m.

Children’s art workshop: “Exploring the Ocean”

With Robin Owings

$15 per child ($25 for two)

FRIDAY, AUG. 8

Northeast Harbor Naturalist’s Notebook Annex, 11 a.m.-noon

Children’s art workshop: “Northeast Harbor Birds”

With Eliza Rockefeller

Free

MONDAY, AUG. 11

Seal Harbor Naturalist’s Notebook, 10-11:30 a.m.

Children’s art workshop: “Exploring Maine Forests and Tides”

With Jordan Chalfant

$15 per child ($25 for two)

TUESDAY, AUG. 12

Seal Harbor Naturalist’s Notebook, 10-11:30 a.m.

Children’s art workshop: “Underground Art: Vegetables, Roots, Caves and Dirt”

With Shannara Gillman

$15 per child ($25 for two)

SPECIAL EVENT ON TUESDAY NIGHT, AUG. 12:

Moore Auditorium, Schoodic Institute in Winter Harbor, 7 p.m.

Alex Filippenko (below) of the University of California at Berkeley, one of the world’s best known and most entertaining astrophysicists, will give a Naturalist’s Notebook-organized  talk hosted by the co-sponsor, the Schoodic Institute (SERC) in Winter Harbor at 7 p.m. Alex, who has been named the national educator of the year and been voted the best professor at Cal nine times, has playfully entitled his talk, ”Exploding Stars and New Planets and Black Holes, Oh My! Frontier Research at Lick Observatory.” He will weave together the fascinating story of Lick, one of the world’s historic observatories, and the exciting discoveries that are still coming out of it. He’ll also offer insights on the Perseid meteor shower, which will be peaking at that time. It’s a talk not to be missed, and Alex will stick around afterward to field questions, pose for photos and share his boundless enthusiasm for astronomy.

Alex Filippenko

Alex Filippenko

WEDNESDAY, AUG. 13

Seal Harbor Naturalist’s Notebook, 10-11:30 a.m.

Children’s art workshop: “Wildflowers and Botany”

With Amy Gagnon

$15 per child ($25 for two)

ALSO: SPECIAL EVENT ON WEDNESDAY NIGHT, AUG. 13:

Moore Auditorium, Schoodic Institute in Winter Harbor, 7 p.m.

Naturalist and writer Bernd Heinrich (below) will reveal some of his latest field discoveries in a fun and enlightening talk entitled, ”Blue Jays: American Chestnut Tree Planters,” hosted by the co-sponsor, the Schoodic Institute (SERC). Pamelia and I were lucky enough to be with Bernd when he was doing some of his research on this subject at his cabin in western Maine. Bernd’s talks are always filled with surprises, insights and humor and this one will be no exception. It will be a great evening, and Bernd will field questions and be available to chat and sign books afterward.

Bernd Heinrich illustrates all his books. The Notebook currently has a show of 14 paintings that will appear in his next book, on birds, which is due out in 2015.

Bernd Heinrich illustrates all his books. The Notebook currently has a show of 14 paintings that will appear in his next book, on birds, which is due out in 2015.

THURSDAY, AUG. 14

Northeast Harbor Naturalist’s Notebook Annex, 11 a.m.-noon

Children’s art workshop: “Making a Specimen Collection”

With Jordan Chalfant

Free

ALSO ON THURSDAY, AUG. 14

Seal Harbor Naturalist’s Notebook, 2-3:30 p.m.

Children’s art workshop: “Exploring the Ocean”

With Robin Owings

$15 per child ($25 for two)

FRIDAY, AUG. 15

Northeast Harbor Naturalist’s Notebook Annex, 11 a.m.-noon

Children’s art workshop: “Northeast Harbor Birds”

With Eliza Rockefeller

Free

ALSO, SPECIAL EVENT ON FRIDAY AFTERNOON, AUG. 15

Seal Harbor Notebook, 3:30-5 p.m.

Reading and book signing by Bernd Heinrich. Bernd will read from his latest release, The Homing Instinct, and possibly tell us about his top secret book-in-progress, due out next year. We will have all of Bernd’s book titles available to purchase as well as exclusive prints of his art.

Bernd with Pamelia on the deck of the Notebook in Seal Harbor last summer.

Bernd with Pamelia on the deck of the Notebook in Seal Harbor last summer.

MONDAY, AUG. 18

Seal Harbor Naturalist’s Notebook, 10-11:30 a.m.

Children’s art workshop: “Exploring Maine Forests and Tides”

With Jordan Chalfant

$15 per child ($25 for two)

TUESDAY, AUG. 19

Seal Harbor Naturalist’s Notebook, 10-11:30 a.m.

Children’s art workshop: “Underground Art: Vegetables, Roots, Caves and Dirt”

With Shannara Gillman

$15 per child ($25 for two)

WEDNESDAY, AUG. 20

Seal Harbor Naturalist’s Notebook, 10-11:30 a.m.

Children’s art workshop: “Wildflowers and Botany”

With Amy Gagnon

$15 per child ($25 for two)

THURSDAY, AUG. 21

Northeast Harbor Naturalist’s Notebook Annex, 11 a.m.-noon

Children’s art workshop: “Making a Specimen Collection”

With Jordan Chalfant

Free

ALSO ON THURSDAY, AUG. 21 

Seal Harbor Naturalist’s Notebook, 2-3:30 p.m.

Children’s art workshop: “Exploring the Ocean”

With Robin Owings

$15 per child ($25 for two)

FRIDAY, AUG. 22

Seal Harbor Notebook, 4 p.m.

Reading and book signing by Eileen Rockefeller (below) of Seal Harbor, author of “Being a Rockefeller, Becoming Myself: A Memoir.”

Eileen Rockefeller

Eileen Rockefeller

The Forest Where 3 Billion Birds Go Each Spring

Palm warblers are one of the species that rely on the boreal forest. (photo courtesy of Jeff Nadler)

About 98 percent of palm warblers breed in the boreal forest of northern North America. They are one of more than 300 species that rely on the boreal forest for their survival. (photo courtesy of Jeff Nadler)

A bird expert once told me that Jeff Wells will one day be viewed as one of the great ornithologists of his generation. Jeff, the former national conservation director of the National Audubon Society, is a visiting fellow at the world-renowned Cornell Lab of Ornithology (where he worked for years) and the science and policy director of the Boreal Songbird Initiative. He is a soft-spoken but forceful advocate for conserving what’s left of the habitat that animals—especially birds—require to breed, feed and survive.

Jeff is also a Maine native and a friend of The Naturalist’s Notebook’s. He led a Notebook birding walk in Seal Harbor a couple of years ago, and we are big promoters of a book he and his wife, Allison, also an ornithologist and conservationist, wrote called Maine’s Favorite Birds. We used the book to create an indoor birding trail in the Notebook two summers ago and have been trying to establish a downtown birding trail in the village of Northeast Harbor, Maine, by encouraging merchants to put illustrations from that book (beautifully done by artist Evan Barbour) into their shop windows for passers-by, especially kids, to identify. In the long term, we would love to help Jeff achieve his dream of getting the book into the hands of every student in every Maine school.

The blackpoll warbler is another boreal regular. Eighty-two percent breed there. (photo courtesy of Jeff Nadler)

The blackpoll warbler is another boreal regular. Eighty-two percent breed there. (photo courtesy of Jeff Nadler)

A boreal forest landscape.

A boreal forest landscape.

Jeff lately has focused his energy on preserving the vast expanse of boreal forest in northern Canada and Alaska. Working with fellow scientists from the Boreal Songbird Initiative, Ducks Unlimited and Ducks Unlimited Canada, he has co-written a new report called “Boreal Birds Need Half: Maintaining North America’s Bird Nursery and Why It Matters.” It’s an extremely important assessment because many bird populations have been declining substantially in recent decades. Since the late 1960s 20 of the most common North American birds have fallen in number by at least half, and the population of evening grosbeaks (to name just one example) have fallen by nearly 80 percent. I asked Jeff to describe the boreal forest and its value to birds.

This map shows the routes taken by birds leaving the boreal forest in late summer and fall. According to Jeff’s report, between 3 billion and 5 billion birds migrate south after young have hatched. About a billion of them winter in the U.S.; others fly as far as Tierra del Fuego, at the southern tip of South America.

This map shows the routes taken by birds leaving the boreal forest in late summer and fall. According to Jeff’s report, between 3 billion and 5 billion birds migrate south after young have hatched. About a billion of them winter in the U.S.; others fly as far as Tierra del Fuego, at the southern tip of South America.

“North America’s boreal forest is one of the world’s largest and most ecologically intact ecosystems,” Jeff told me in an email. “It extends over 1.5 billion acres from interior Alaska across the northern two-thirds of Canada all the way to (and including) Newfoundland. The boreal forest is host to a between one and three billion nesting birds of over 300 species making it one of the world’s greatest ‘bird nurseries.’

Oscar Lake is surrounded by boreal forest in Canada's Northwest territories. (photo courtesy of Ducks Unlimited Canada)

A typical boreal forest lake in Canada’s Northwest territories. Canada’s boreal forest is home to 25 percent of the world’s wetlands. Eighty percent of North America’s waterfowl species are heavily reliant on the boreal forest and its wetlands for breeding and nesting. (photo courtesy of Ducks Unlimited Canada)

“This abundance of birds occurs here,” Jeff continued, “because the boreal forest region is still mostly unfragmented and within the region there is an amazing diversity of healthy and pristine habitats including millions of lakes and ponds, one of the world’s largest wetland complexes, forests of spruce, jack pine, balsam fir, and aspen, bogs, fens, marshes, tundra, barrens. And along with all these birds, the boreal forest region supports North America’s last remaining large populations of wolves, grizzy bears, wolverine, caribou and even the southernmost population of polar bears in the world!”

Two of the birds under threat are the Canada warbler and the evening grosbeak.

Two of the boreal breeding birds already in danger are the Canada warbler and the evening grosbeak.

Another boreal-dependent species, the short-billed dowitcher. (photo courtesy of Jeff Nadler)

Another boreal-dependent species, the short-billed dowitcher. (photo courtesy of Jeff Nadler)

Studies have determined that most of the songbirds and waterfowl that breed in the boreal forest do so in low densities over large expanses. Protecting those birds means preserving vast tracts, not small, concentrated nesting areas. And that is the message of Jeff’s report. At least half of the boreal forest “must remain free of large-scale industrial disturbance,” the report states, and “industrial activities undertaken in the remaining unprotected areas should be carried out with the highest global sustainability standards, with an emphasis on maintaining healthy and pristine wetlands and waterways.”

And yet another, the Hudsonian godwit. (photo courtesy of Len Blumin)

And yet another beautiful boreal breeder, the Hudsonian godwit. (photo courtesy of Len Blumin)

Jeff and the Boreal Songbird Initiative will continue to work to see that those goals are met, in negotiations with the Canadian government, provincial governments, native populations and industry. The birds don’t have a voice in the matter, unfortunately, so Jeff—and we—have to speak for them.

That's Jeff (left) on a visit to the Notebook.

That’s Jeff (left) on a visit to the Notebook back in 2012.

 

Here is a portion of the birding group on the Notebook deck holding up Jeff's book.

Here is a portion of the birding group on the Notebook deck holding up Jeff’s book.

A bonus treat for those of you who don't see The Naturalist's Notebook page on Facebook: A photo of crow's eggs taken recently by the great naturalist and writer Bernd Heinrich near his cabin in western Maine.  Yes, Bernd climbed to the top of a tree to get the shot.

A bonus for those of you who don’t see The Naturalist’s Notebook page on Facebook: A photo of crow’s eggs taken recently by the great naturalist and writer Bernd Heinrich near his cabin in western Maine. Yes, Bernd climbed to the top of a tree to get the shot.

 

 

 

Big Waves and Big Ideas

The surf at Schoodic was some of the wildest Pamelia and I have seen in this area.

The surf at Schoodic was some of the wildest Pamelia and I have seen in this area.

Surf, scientists and students were out in force at yesterday’s invigorating Acadia National Park Science Symposium at the  Schoodic Institute campus. Among the more than 130 participants and speakers were Rick Bonney of the Cornell Lab of Ornithology (below, who invented the term citizen science in 1995 and later helped create ebird), Mark Chandler of the Earthwatch Institute (which is launching a seven-year citizen-science partnership with the institute and Acadia to study ocean acidification and other environmental issues), the MDI Bio Lab’s Jane Disney (also below, explaining  links between the rise of green crabs and the decline of eelgrass near MDI), College of the Atlantic’s Catherine Clinger (science and art), Maine Sea Grant’s Catherine Schmitt (science communication), the University of Maine’s Sarah Nelson (mercury contamination in dragonfly larvae in Acadia), MDIBL geneticist Karen James (biotrails and DNA barcoding) and others.

Bravo to Abe Miller-Rushing, Seth Benz, Mike Soukup, Sheridan Steele and the whole forward-thinking Acadia-Schoodic team, which is striving to put Acadia and Schoodic at the forefront of science research in the national park system and on the frontier of knowledge. We’ve worked with them for several years. Pamelia is now part of a dynamic group of Dixon Schoodic Scholars, about whom I’ll write more soon.

Abe, Seth, Mike, Sheridan and Co. put on a world-class event. If you missed it, you can watch the talks at livestream.com (http://new.livestream.com/accounts/4350281).

The Cornell Lab's Rick Bonney, and yes, the title of his talk was Citizen Science Is Just Like Bartending. You'll have to watch it on lifestream.com.

Yes, the talk by the Cornell Lab’s Rick Bonney was entitled Citizen Science Is Just Like Bartending. If you’re intrigued, watch it on livestream.com.

Jane Disney was one of many researchers who discussed their projects with the help of large posters between lectures.

Jane Disney was one of many researchers who discussed their projects with the help of large posters.

More of those wild waves!

More of those wild waves. If you’ve never made the drive to Schoodic, which is one peninsula up the coast from Mount Desert Island, you should. Pamelia has made trips there her whole life.